Posts From Teddy Burrage

Teddy Burrage
Teddy Burrage 8 posts

Teddy Burrage is a Portland native and local activist. He was formerly a congressional intern and organizer with the Portland Racial Justice Congress. Teddy hopes contribute to positive change in Maine by promoting social justice and civic engagement.

democracy

Rising tide of white nationalism prompts free speech debate at USM

The normalization of bigotry in the wake of Trump’s election has taken new heights. Nationally-known racist, Sen. Jeff Sessions, has been confirmed as Attorney General and Steven Bannon, a white

equality

Burrage: Women’s marchers are attacking the very basis of sexism and violence

In the wake of the historic Women’s March, which represented the largest collective demonstration in  American history, many people have made criticisms about the relatively easy life women in the

democracy

Burrage: Here’s how we can repair our democracy following this emotional election

This election is jam packed with emotions: excitement, disillusionment, hope, fear, joy, and anger. Because it is so emotional—coupled with our new social dynamics facilitated by Facebook and Twitter—many people

democracy

Question 5 could improve Maine’s political climate

If anything is certain, the 2016 campaign season has brought to light that many voters are growing weary of negative campaigning and the feeling as if their government is unresponsive

racial justice

The problem isn’t Gov. LePage’s mental state, but his underlying racism

Last Friday, we reached the regretful point at which the holder of the highest office in the State of Maine defined people of color and Hispanics as “the enemy.” Increasingly

racial justice

With Black Lives Matter misinformation, Rep. Pingree’s opponent stirs up racial animus

Republican Congressional candidate for Maine’s 1st District, Mark Holbrook, outlines on his website his priorities for race relations in the US including a blog entitled the “War on Police.” Throughout

organizing

Portland protest digs up roots of racial unrest

For many, the Black Lives Matter protest two Fridays ago in Portland triggered a sharp pang of racial discomfort—a feeling as if the tide of racial unrest had spilled over

organizing

Going unseen means going unheard: Why you shouldn’t be colorblind

As a person of color, I’m often confronted with a well-intentioned viewpoint from my friends, family, and community members (usually white) who purport that they are “colorblind.” They idealize a